Crafty Writers in Manchester

Crafty WritersI’m keen to tell you about a fabulous writers’ group known as the Crafty Writers. They’re based in Manchester, and I was lucky enough to be welcomed to one of their sessions.

I can barely keep up with the number of places I’ve been too so far in my writerly roaming about the UK — Bath, Exeter, Plymouth, Manchester, London (three times so far), Penzance… Many places have been on a whim, guided at times by writing and music opportunities, and other times perhaps by childhood memories. For example, in Penzance I went to a place called Land’s End and peered out over the steep cliffs. It was like standing on the United Kingdom’s big toe and peering outwards. I’d last visited Land’s End when I was eleven.

But back to Manchester’s Crafty Writers’ Group — one of my special writing opportunities.  It was my mother, would you believe (she is also a writer), who put me on to the group. She’d read one of the group member’s (Jayne Fallows) short stories in the UK writers’ mag Writers’ Forum. It was a terrific short story called The Worst Party Ever. Beneath the story, Writer’s Forum mentioned Jayne’s involvement in the Crafty Writers. Happily they have a website (see link below) and I was easily able to contact them. 

Home of the Craft Writers.

Home of the Crafty Writers.

I made it to the group the same day I exited from the writers’ retreat in Shropshire — going to the group straight from the train and pulling my wheelie luggage behind me. It did feel a bit of a whirlwind.

The group is making a shift from workshopping about the craft of writing to critiquing each other’s work. On the Saturday afternoon I was there, everybody was trying their hand at something different. And all the writing was very accomplished. I listened to everything from historical fiction to poetic prose to the structuring of a book on writing craft (this latter is the project of the groups’ convenor, Lorrie Porter).

Some crafty writers in action.

Some crafty writers in action.


I had the fortune to test-run the changes to the opening paragraphs of my own manuscript and received immediate feedback from everyone — which has allowed me to refine the opening words to Beneath the Surface (perhaps the most important words of any book). 
On the day, I also pulled out my camera and was rapt at their preparedness for a few photos, as you can see.

You can find out more about the Manchester Crafty Writers Group on their website here.

And here are a few more photos of marvellous Manchester (or ‘awesome Manchester’, as one nephew calls it)…

Chetham's Library - the oldest public library in UK.

Chetham’s Library, the oldest public library in UK.

The library dates from 1653. Here’s a corridor you see as you first enter, where the monks lived (the librarians, I guess). I needed to be escorted in, but was then free to roam.

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An aisle of the library.

An aisle of the library.

All change. A different kind of library — inside a Manchester record store. Manchester, of course, has given the world many great bands.

RecordsThe BBC’s headquarters are now located in Manchester…

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And here’s one I had to share with you, a famous Smiths location…

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Finally, I leave you with a quote I saw in Manchester’s football museum that I believe equally applies to writing as football…

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At a writers’ retreat in Shropshire

long shot of Hurst

My post about the writers’ retreat in Shropshire has had to wait until I finally got over a nasty chest infection (well, almost over) — a hearty thanks to the UK’s National Health Service for their support in this.

So what, in a single sentence, did I get out of my near-week long retreat in a remote part of Shropshire? Easy. Two answers. I spent a week rebooting the writer in me (something I’ve come to realise I needed). And I made a whole host of brand new writer friends.

Pat

Sharing our work

There were sixteen of us — emerging writers — staying in the Georgian Manor pictured above. Plus, the two established authors, Mavis Cheek and Stephen May, who looked after our writerly interests for the week. Then of course there was also the onsite staff, including a poet laureate who helped with lunch meals in the day. Some like me brought their works in progress, others were there to kickstart new projects. There was so much diverse and energetic writing talent in one place, it was wonderful to be a part of it — hearing first hand about each other’s projects, and listening in as they shared their work. 

A typical day for me began with getting in some quick writing (with the aid of a plunger of coffee) before grabbing a small breakfast and gathering in the main tutorial room. In these morning sessions, all of us fresh and ready for the day, we would look closely at any number of aspects of writing, from enriching dialogue, to the eight-point structure, creating good place and setting, and research. While I was already familiar with many of these topics — as were others too — they came very candidly from the personal perspectives of the two established authors and so felt new and engaging.

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Spending some time in the afternoon sun.

The afternoons were given over to our own writing time, informal chats about writing, walks about the grounds and on-on-one sessions.

In the evenings we had the cooking groups. This was my only stress of the week. Recipes were there to help us, and staff were on hand where possible. Yet it was still an ordeal given the number of us and the variety of dietary preferences. In the end, I was proud of the chocolate pudding I somehow created (I kept the recipe but I’m not sure I could ever manage it a second time), but I felt for my fellow writers Pat and Anne who took on most of the lasagne cooking tasks. Imagine making vegetarian lasagne for that many people — plus two smaller ones for other dietary requirements. I helped them where I could.

The evenings after dinner were devoted to presenting written works. We heard from the author tutors, a guest writer  Selma Dabbagh (who was very generous with sharing her personal writing experiences) and, of course, ourselves. 

Readings on the last night (the guitar came later)

Readings on the last night (the guitar came later, as did much jolly abandon)

Happily, much of the feedback for my draft of Beneath the Surface was of a fine tuning nature — or ‘grace notes’, as Mavis Cheek liked to call them. Significantly, however, I was compelled to revisit my opening lines. The opening lines of a novel are critical. No matter how exciting the rest of your story may be, if you have not engaged the reader’s interest from the start, they will not stick around to marvel at those gems waiting later in your book. It was good feedback which I have gladly taken.

So, enough chat, onto some more pictures….

First up, a shelfie. This is a shelf from one of the bookcases I noticed when I first wrote about this retreat some months ago (back in Australia). It now has a new home next to the author tutors’ rooms (and mine – clearly I’d been the first to book in).

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Here’s John Osborne’s (playwright and former owner of the estate) favourite view. I’m standing just beyond the back of the house…

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I had the room directly above me in this photo…

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A walkabout, one afternoon, as I was reflecting on exciting writing ideas, perhaps…

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Finally, I leave you with a short piece I wrote during one of the morning sessions. It’s about my visit back to the old house where I grew up. I’ve not reworked it since the session, besides fixing a typo.

The wide avenue of my memory

Last week I visited my childhood home for the first time in over 40 years. The road up was bendy and thin. Not the wide avenue of my memory.

The first thing I noticed was the red sold sign attached to the hedging. So the people here don’t want to be here anymore? I thought. What a silly thought. What did it matter?

The house, two-storey, semi-detached, leaned to one side and seemed the worst kept in the street. Its sad eyes looked out and passed me.

It was as if I was visiting something I’d once read about in a book.

I peered up at the upper bedroom window, knowing that was where I and my two brothers once slept.

How did a family of seven live in this place for so many years?

I wasn’t going to, but I tried the door knocker. A dog barked. No one was home. But I remembered the sound of the door knocker well. Deep, warm and woody. Want a funny, unexpected thing to remember.

When I walked on to top of the hill, the way I used to go to school as a child, I turned around and looked down. I saw a view I did not recall. I did not know was there. I saw the town stretch away across the valley. I saw where it ended, and there were open fields rising into hills. I saw jets in the distance, landing and taking off.